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Series of UW-Madison Talks to Examine Culture, Conflict in Iraq

April 5, 2006

Untitled DocumFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Ronnie Hess, Director of Communications, Division of International Studies, UW-Madison, (608) 262-5590, rlhess@wisc.edu

SERIES OF UW-MADISON TALKS TO EXAMINE CULTURE, CONFLICT IN IRAQ

Madison – The UW-Madison Division of International Studies announces a series of talks, “Three Perspectives on Iraq, Three Years Later,” to be held on the UW-Madison campus Monday, April 17 and Tuesday, April 18. The talks will feature Columbia University professor Muhsin Al-Musawi, one of the Arab world’s leading literary critics; UW-Madison professor Neil Whitehead, author of several books on violence, warfare and terrorism; and Duke University history professor Alex Roland. The speakers will raise questions surrounding culture and power in conflict in Iraq; how violence can be a form of cultural expression; and how the war in Iraq may provide a window on the future of American military operations. The series includes:
• Monday, April 17

“Reading Iraq: Culture and Power in Conflict”

Muhsin Al-Musawi, professor of Arabic literature, Columbia University

4:00 p.m., 8417 Social Science, 1180 Observatory Drive

Sponsored by the Division of International Studies, Middle East Studies, African Languages and Literature, Global Studies

• Tuesday, April 18

“Wars without End: Addictive Violence and the Mission of Democracy”

Neil Whitehead, professor of anthropology and religious studies, UW-Madison

12:00 noon, Room 126 Memorial Library, Library Mall

Sponsored by the Legacies of Violence Research Circle of the International Institute with the participation of the Memorial Library

• Tuesday, April 18

“The Long War Dead: The Politics and Reality of Casualties in Iraq”

Alex Roland, professor of history, Duke University

7:00 p.m., Wisconsin Veterans Museum, 30 W. Mifflin Street, Suite 200

Sponsored by the Center for World Affairs and the Global Economy and co-sponsored by the Wisconsin Veterans Museum, UW-Madison Department of History, the Harvey Goldberg Center

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